Water Vapor

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'''[[Water Vapor]]''' is called aqueous vapor, moisture. '''[[Water]]''' substance in vapor form; one of the most important of all constituents of the '''[[atmosphere]]'''. '''[[Water Vapor]]''' is called aqueous vapor, moisture. '''[[Water]]''' substance in vapor form; one of the most important of all constituents of the '''[[atmosphere]]'''.
-Water vapor can be produced from the evaporation or boiling of liquid water or from the sublimation of ice. Under typical atmospheric conditions, water vapor is continuously generated by evaporation and removed by condensation. +Water vapor can be produced from the '''[[evaporation]]''' or boiling of '''[[liquid]]''' water or from the sublimation of ice.
 + 
 +Under typical atmospheric conditions, water vapor is continuously generated by evaporation and removed by '''[[condensation]]'''.
It is lighter than air and triggers convection currents that can lead to clouds. It is lighter than air and triggers convection currents that can lead to clouds.

Revision as of 17:40, 17 September 2011

Water Vapor is called aqueous vapor, moisture. Water substance in vapor form; one of the most important of all constituents of the atmosphere. Science On a Sphere, NOOA see link [1]
Water Vapor is called aqueous vapor, moisture. Water substance in vapor form; one of the most important of all constituents of the atmosphere. Science On a Sphere, NOOA see link [1]


Water Vapor is called aqueous vapor, moisture. Water substance in vapor form; one of the most important of all constituents of the atmosphere.

Water vapor can be produced from the evaporation or boiling of liquid water or from the sublimation of ice.

Under typical atmospheric conditions, water vapor is continuously generated by evaporation and removed by condensation.

It is lighter than air and triggers convection currents that can lead to clouds.


Also See

Reference

  • See Wikipedia Water vapour [2]




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