Safe area

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is a term used in television production to describe the areas of the television picture that can be seen on television screens. is a term used in television production to describe the areas of the television picture that can be seen on television screens.
-[[Image:Standard video res.svg.png|500|thumb|none|A visual comparison of common TV ''display resolutions''. A PAL image is made out of 720x576 non square pixels, NTSC is 720x486. However both have an aspect ratio of 4:3, leading to inaccuracies within this image. NTSC DV/DVD have only 480 active lines in order to accommodate compression pixel blocks.]]+[[Image:Standard video res.svg.png|700|thumb|none|A visual comparison of common TV ''display resolutions''. A PAL image is made out of 720x576 non square pixels, NTSC is 720x486. However both have an aspect ratio of 4:3, leading to inaccuracies within this image. NTSC DV/DVD have only 480 active lines in order to accommodate compression pixel blocks.]]
The title safe area is, in television broadcasting, a rectangular area which is far enough in from the four edges, such that text or graphics show neatly: with a margin and without distortion. This is applied against a worst case of on-screen location and display type. Typically corners would require more space from the edges, but due to increased quality of the average display this is no longer the concern it used to be, even on CRTs. The title safe area is, in television broadcasting, a rectangular area which is far enough in from the four edges, such that text or graphics show neatly: with a margin and without distortion. This is applied against a worst case of on-screen location and display type. Typically corners would require more space from the edges, but due to increased quality of the average display this is no longer the concern it used to be, even on CRTs.

Revision as of 10:01, 17 August 2009

is a term used in television production to describe the areas of the television picture that can be seen on television screens.

A visual comparison of common TV display resolutions. A PAL image is made out of 720x576 non square pixels, NTSC is 720x486. However both have an aspect ratio of 4:3, leading to inaccuracies within this image. NTSC DV/DVD have only 480 active lines in order to accommodate compression pixel blocks.
A visual comparison of common TV display resolutions. A PAL image is made out of 720x576 non square pixels, NTSC is 720x486. However both have an aspect ratio of 4:3, leading to inaccuracies within this image. NTSC DV/DVD have only 480 active lines in order to accommodate compression pixel blocks.

The title safe area is, in television broadcasting, a rectangular area which is far enough in from the four edges, such that text or graphics show neatly: with a margin and without distortion. This is applied against a worst case of on-screen location and display type. Typically corners would require more space from the edges, but due to increased quality of the average display this is no longer the concern it used to be, even on CRTs.

Reference;

See Wikipedia Safe Area [1]

Also see


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