Mountain

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('''Mountain Glossary''')
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-[[Image:Mountain slope.jpg|thumb|400px|'''[[Mountain]]''' is a large landform that stretches above the surrounding land in a limited area usually in the form of a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a hill.]]+[[Image:Mountain slope.jpg|thumb|500px|'''[[Mountain]]''' is a large landform that stretches above the surrounding land in a limited area usually in the form of a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a '''[[hill]]'''.]]
-'''[[Mountain]]''' is a large landform that stretches above the surrounding land in a limited area usually in the form of a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a hill. The adjective montane is used to describe mountainous areas and things associated with them. The study of mountains is called '''[[Orography]]'''.+'''[[Mountain]]''' is a large '''[[landform]]''' that stretches above the surrounding land in a limited area usually in the form of a '''[[peak]]'''.
-Mountain environments cover some '''27 per cent''' of the world’s land surface, and directly support the '''22 per cent''' of the world’s people who live within mountain regions. Lowland people also depend on mountain environments for a wide range of goods and services, including '''[[water]]''', energy, timber, biodiversity maintenance, and opportunities for recreation and spiritual renewal.+A mountain is generally steeper than a '''[[hill]]'''.
 + 
 +The adjective montane is used to describe mountainous areas and things associated with them. The study of mountains is called '''[[Orography]]'''.
 + 
 +Mountain environments cover some '''27 per cent''' of the world’s land surface, and directly support the '''22 per cent''' of the world’s people who live within mountain regions.
 + 
 +Lowland people also depend on mountain environments for a wide range of goods and services, including '''[[water]]''', energy, timber, biodiversity maintenance, and opportunities for recreation and spiritual renewal.
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-== '''[[Mountain Glossary]]''' ==+== '''[[Mountain Glossary]]''' - See '''[[Landform Gallery]]''' ==
- +[[Image:Glaciers mountain terms.jpg|thumb|450px]]
*'''[[Arete]]''' a steep-sided, sharp-edged bedrock ridge formed by two '''[[glaciers]]''' eroding away on opposite sides of the ridge. *'''[[Arete]]''' a steep-sided, sharp-edged bedrock ridge formed by two '''[[glaciers]]''' eroding away on opposite sides of the ridge.
-'''[[Canyon]]''' (occasionally spelled cañon) or gorge is a deep ravine between '''[[cliffs]]''' often carved from the landscape by a '''[[river]]'''.+*'''[[Canyon]]''' (occasionally spelled cañon) or gorge is a deep ravine between '''[[cliffs]]''' often carved from the landscape by a '''[[river]]'''.
*'''[[Cirque]]''' A steep-walled mountain basin which usually forms the blunt end of a '''[[valley]]'''. (French for "circus.") *'''[[Cirque]]''' A steep-walled mountain basin which usually forms the blunt end of a '''[[valley]]'''. (French for "circus.")
*'''[[Col]]''' A dip in a ridge that forms a small, high pass. *'''[[Col]]''' A dip in a ridge that forms a small, high pass.
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*'''[[River]]''' A river is a natural watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing toward an ocean, a '''[[lake]]''', a sea, or another river. *'''[[River]]''' A river is a natural watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing toward an ocean, a '''[[lake]]''', a sea, or another river.
*'''[[Saddle]]''' A high pass between two peaks. *'''[[Saddle]]''' A high pass between two peaks.
 +[[Image:Glacial landscape.svg.png|thumb|350px]]
*'''[[Slope]]''' is used to describe the steepness, incline, gradient, or '''[[grade]]''' of a straight line. A higher slope value indicates a steeper incline. *'''[[Slope]]''' is used to describe the steepness, incline, gradient, or '''[[grade]]''' of a straight line. A higher slope value indicates a steeper incline.
*'''[[Snow line]]''' The lowest '''[[elevation]]''' area of a perennial snow field on high terrain, such as a '''[[mountain]]''' range. The climatic snow line is the point above which '''[[snow]]''' and '''[[ice]]''' cover the ground throughout the year. The actual snow line may seasonally be significantly lower. *'''[[Snow line]]''' The lowest '''[[elevation]]''' area of a perennial snow field on high terrain, such as a '''[[mountain]]''' range. The climatic snow line is the point above which '''[[snow]]''' and '''[[ice]]''' cover the ground throughout the year. The actual snow line may seasonally be significantly lower.
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*'''[[Valley]]''' a valley or dale is a depression with predominant extent in one direction. A very deep '''[[river]]''' valley may be called a canyon or gorge. *'''[[Valley]]''' a valley or dale is a depression with predominant extent in one direction. A very deep '''[[river]]''' valley may be called a canyon or gorge.
-== Also see ==+== '''Also see''' ==
- +<div style="column-count:2;-moz-column-count:2;-webkit-column-count:2">
*'''[[Physical Features of Mountains]]''' *'''[[Physical Features of Mountains]]'''
*'''[[Defining Mountain Regions]]''' *'''[[Defining Mountain Regions]]'''
*'''[[Snow and Weather Glossary]]''' *'''[[Snow and Weather Glossary]]'''
 +*'''[[Mountains and Mountain Forests Global Statistical Summary]]'''
*'''[[Frozen Ground]]''' *'''[[Frozen Ground]]'''
*'''[[Cryosphere]]''' *'''[[Cryosphere]]'''
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*'''[[Tree line]]''' *'''[[Tree line]]'''
*'''[[Frost line]]''' *'''[[Frost line]]'''
 +*'''[[Landform]]'''
 +*'''[[Riparian areas]]'''
 +*'''[[Wetlands]]'''
 +*'''[[Ski area]]'''
 +</div>
== '''Reference''' == == '''Reference''' ==
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[[Category:Freestyle Glossary]][[Category:Working with Snow and the Weather]][[Category:Weather]][[Category:Snow]][[Category:Freestyle Course Preparation]] [[Category:Freestyle Glossary]][[Category:Working with Snow and the Weather]][[Category:Weather]][[Category:Snow]][[Category:Freestyle Course Preparation]]
 +[[Category:Mountains]]

Current revision

Mountain is a large landform that stretches above the surrounding land in a limited area usually in the form of a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a hill.
Mountain is a large landform that stretches above the surrounding land in a limited area usually in the form of a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a hill.

Mountain is a large landform that stretches above the surrounding land in a limited area usually in the form of a peak.

A mountain is generally steeper than a hill.

The adjective montane is used to describe mountainous areas and things associated with them. The study of mountains is called Orography.

Mountain environments cover some 27 per cent of the world’s land surface, and directly support the 22 per cent of the world’s people who live within mountain regions.

Lowland people also depend on mountain environments for a wide range of goods and services, including water, energy, timber, biodiversity maintenance, and opportunities for recreation and spiritual renewal.


Contents

[edit] Class of Mountains

  • 1 elevation > 4 500 m
  • 2 elevation 3 500 – 4 500 m
  • 3 elevation 2 500 – 3 500 m
  • 4 elevation 1 500 – 2 500 m and slope ‡ 2°
  • 5 elevation 1 000 – 1 500 m and slope ‡ 5° or local elevation range (7 km radius) > 300 m
  • 6 elevation 300 – 1 000 m and local elevation range (7 km radius) > 300 m
  • 7 isolated inner basins and plateaus less than 25 km2 in extent that are surrounded by mountains but do not themselves meet criteria 1-6


[edit] “Seven Summits”, the highest peaks on every continent

Continent Peak Elevation (meters)

  • Asia Mt. Everest/Sagarmatha/Chomolangma 8,850
  • South America Mt. Aconcagua 6,960
  • North America Mt. McKinley/Denali 6,194
  • Africa Mt. Kilimanjaro 5,963
  • Europe Mt. Elbrus 5,642
  • Australia/Oceania Mt. Puncak Jaya 5,030
  • Antarctica Mt. Vinson Massif 4,897


[edit] Mountain Glossary - See Landform Gallery

  • Arete a steep-sided, sharp-edged bedrock ridge formed by two glaciers eroding away on opposite sides of the ridge.
  • Canyon (occasionally spelled cañon) or gorge is a deep ravine between cliffs often carved from the landscape by a river.
  • Cirque A steep-walled mountain basin which usually forms the blunt end of a valley. (French for "circus.")
  • Col A dip in a ridge that forms a small, high pass.
  • Couloir An open, steep gully, usually containing ice or snow.
  • Elevation is the measure of height with respect to a point on the earth's surface above mean sea level.
  • Glacier is a perennial mass of ice which moves over land.
  • Lake (from Latin lacus) is a terrain feature (or physical feature), a body of liquid on the surface of a world that is localized to the bottom of basin (another type of landform or terrain feature; that is, it is not global).
  • Moraine is any glacially formed accumulation of unconsolidated glacial debris (soil and rock) which can occur in currently glaciated and formerly glaciated regions, such as those areas acted upon by a past ice age.
  • Pyramidal peak, or sometimes in its most extreme form called a glacial horn, is a mountaintop that has been modified by the action of ice during glaciation and frost weathering. If the use is unambiguous within a mountain context, then the simple terms peak or horn may be used.
  • River A river is a natural watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing toward an ocean, a lake, a sea, or another river.
  • Saddle A high pass between two peaks.
  • Slope is used to describe the steepness, incline, gradient, or grade of a straight line. A higher slope value indicates a steeper incline.
  • Snow line The lowest elevation area of a perennial snow field on high terrain, such as a mountain range. The climatic snow line is the point above which snow and ice cover the ground throughout the year. The actual snow line may seasonally be significantly lower.
  • Tree line or timberline is the edge of the habitat at which trees are capable of growing. Beyond the tree line, they are unable to grow because of inappropriate environmental conditions (usually cold temperatures, insufficient air pressure, or lack of moisture). At the tree line, tree growth is often very stunted, with the last trees forming low, densely matted bushes.
  • Valley a valley or dale is a depression with predominant extent in one direction. A very deep river valley may be called a canyon or gorge.

[edit] Also see

[edit] Reference

  1. Wikipedia see Mountain [1]
  2. Mountain Watch Defining Mountain Regions [2]

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