Lux

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A lux meter for measuring illuminances in work places. The lux (symbol: lx) is the SI unit of illuminance and luminous emittance. It is used in photometry as a measure of the apparent intensity of light hitting or passing through a surface. It is analogous to the radiometric unit watts per square metre, but with the power at each wavelength weighted according to the luminosity function, a standardized model of human brightness perception. A lux meter for measuring illuminances in work places. The lux (symbol: lx) is the SI unit of illuminance and luminous emittance. It is used in photometry as a measure of the apparent intensity of light hitting or passing through a surface. It is analogous to the radiometric unit watts per square metre, but with the power at each wavelength weighted according to the luminosity function, a standardized model of human brightness perception.
 +
 +{| class="wikitable"
 +!Illuminance!!Example
 +|-
 +|10<sup>-5</sup> lux ||Light from the brightest star ([[Sirius]])<ref name="radfaq">Paul Schlyter, [http://stjarnhimlen.se/comp/radfaq.html#10 Radiometry and photometry in astronomy FAQ] (2006)</ref>
 +|-
 +|10<sup>-4</sup> lux||Total [[starlight]], overcast sky<ref name=radfaq/>
 +|-
 +|0.002 lux||Moonless clear night sky with [[airglow]]<ref name=radfaq/>
 +|-
 +|0.01 lux||Quarter moon
 +|-
 +|0.27 lux||Full moon on a clear night<ref name=radfaq/><ref>{{cite web | url=http://en.petzl.com/petzl/frontoffice/Lampes/static/referentiel/present_referentiel_en.jsp |title=Petzl reference system for lighting performance |accessdate=2007-04-24 |format=html }}</ref>
 +|-
 +|1 lux||Full moon overhead at tropical [[latitude]]s<ref>{{cite journal |last=Bunning |first=Erwin |coauthors= and Moser, Ilse |year=1969 |month=April |title=Interference of moonlight with the photoperiodic measurement of time by plants, and their adaptive reaction |journal=Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America |volume=62 |issue=4 |pages=1018–1022 |url=http://www.pnas.org/cgi/reprint/62/4/1018 |doi=10.1073/pnas.62.4.1018 |accessdate=2006-11-10 |pmid=16591742 }}</ref>
 +|-
 +|3.4 lux|| Dark limit of civil [[twilight]] under a clear sky<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.burle.com/cgi-bin/byteserver.pl/pdf/Electro_Optics.pdf |title=Electro-Optics Handbook |format=pdf |work=burle.com |pages=p. 63}}</ref>
 +|-
 +|50 lux||Family living room<ref>{{Citation|first=Alan |last=Pears |publisher=Australian Greenhouse Office|title=Strategic Study of Household Energy and Greenhouse Issues|date=June, 1998|url=http://www.energyrating.gov.au/library/pubs/pears-ago1998.pdf |format=PDF|chapter=Chapter 7: Appliance technologies and scope for emission reduction |page=61 |accessdate =2008-06-26}}.</ref>
 +|-
 +|80 lux||Hallway/toilet<ref>{{Citation|author=Australian Greenhouse Office|title=Working Energy Resource and training kit: Lighting|date=May, 2005|url=http://www.greenhouse.gov.au/lgmodules/wep/lights/index.html|contribution=Chapter 5: Assessing lighting savings|contribution-url=http://www.greenhouse.gov.au/lgmodules/wep/lights/training/training9.html|accessdate =2007-03-13|format={{dead link|date=June 2008}} – <sup>[http://scholar.google.co.uk/scholar?hl=en&lr=&q=intitle%3AWorking+Energy+Resource+and+training+kit%3A+Lighting&as_publication=&as_ylo=&as_yhi=&btnG=Search Scholar search]</sup>}}.</ref>
 +|-
 +|100 lux ||Very dark overcast day<ref name=radfaq/>
 +|-
 +|320 lux || Recommended office lighting (Australia)<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.energy-toolbox.vic.gov.au/energy_toolbox/summer_push/how_to_use_a_lux_meter.html|title=How to use a lux meter (Australian recommendation)}}</ref>
 +|-
 +|400 lux ||[[Sunrise]] or [[sunset]] on a clear day. Well-lit office area.
 +|-
 +|500 lux ||Lighting level for an office according to the European law UNI EN 12464.
 +|-
 +|1,000 lux||Overcast day<ref name=radfaq/>; typical [[TV studio]] lighting
 +|-
 +|10,000–25,000 lux ||Full [[daylight]] (not direct sun)<ref name=radfaq/>
 +|-
 +|32,000–130,000 lux||Direct [[sunlight]]
 +|}
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Revision as of 15:36, 17 April 2009

A lux meter for measuring illuminances in work places. The lux (symbol: lx) is the SI unit of illuminance and luminous emittance. It is used in photometry as a measure of the apparent intensity of light hitting or passing through a surface. It is analogous to the radiometric unit watts per square metre, but with the power at each wavelength weighted according to the luminosity function, a standardized model of human brightness perception.

IlluminanceExample
10-5 lux Light from the brightest star (Sirius)<ref name="radfaq">Paul Schlyter, Radiometry and photometry in astronomy FAQ (2006)</ref>
10-4 luxTotal starlight, overcast sky<ref name=radfaq/>
0.002 luxMoonless clear night sky with airglow<ref name=radfaq/>
0.01 luxQuarter moon
0.27 luxFull moon on a clear night<ref name=radfaq/><ref>Template:Cite web</ref>
1 luxFull moon overhead at tropical latitudes<ref>Template:Cite journal</ref>
3.4 lux Dark limit of civil twilight under a clear sky<ref>Template:Cite web</ref>
50 luxFamily living room<ref>Template:Citation.</ref>
80 luxHallway/toilet<ref>Template:Citation.</ref>
100 lux Very dark overcast day<ref name=radfaq/>
320 lux Recommended office lighting (Australia)<ref>Template:Cite web</ref>
400 lux Sunrise or sunset on a clear day. Well-lit office area.
500 lux Lighting level for an office according to the European law UNI EN 12464.
1,000 luxOvercast day<ref name=radfaq/>; typical TV studio lighting
10,000–25,000 lux Full daylight (not direct sun)<ref name=radfaq/>
32,000–130,000 luxDirect sunlight

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Reference

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