Landform

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Revision as of 11:29, 8 August 2011 (edit)
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(''' Landform Gallery''')
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(''' Landform Gallery''')
 
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Image:Fajada in snow.jpg|Chaco and Fajada '''[[Butte]]''' [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fajada_Butte] is located in northwestern New Mexico. Image:Fajada in snow.jpg|Chaco and Fajada '''[[Butte]]''' [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fajada_Butte] is located in northwestern New Mexico.
-Image:Cirque mountain.jpg|A steep-walled '''[[mountain]]''' basin which usually forms the blunt end of a '''[[valley]]'''. (French for "circus.")+Image:Cirque mountain.jpg|'''[[Cirque]]''' is a steep-walled '''[[mountain]]''' basin which usually forms the blunt end of a '''[[valley]]'''. (French for "circus.")
Image:Red Mountain Pass.jpg|A Mountain Pass or '''[[Col]]''' is in a range of '''[[hills]]''' or, especially, of '''[[mountains]]''', a '''[[pass]]''' (also gap, notch, col,''' [[saddle]]''', hause, bwlch (Welsh), brennig or bealach (Gaelic) is a path that allows the crossing of a '''[[mountain]]''' chain.. Image:Red Mountain Pass.jpg|A Mountain Pass or '''[[Col]]''' is in a range of '''[[hills]]''' or, especially, of '''[[mountains]]''', a '''[[pass]]''' (also gap, notch, col,''' [[saddle]]''', hause, bwlch (Welsh), brennig or bealach (Gaelic) is a path that allows the crossing of a '''[[mountain]]''' chain..
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Image:Columbia Icefield-Saskatchewan Glacier.jpg|'''[[Ice field]]''' is an area less than '''50,000 km²''' (19,305 mile²) of ice often found in the colder '''[[climates]]''' and higher '''[[altitudes]]''' of the world where there is sufficient '''[[precipitation]]'''. It is an extensive area of interconnected '''[[valley]]''' '''[[glaciers]]''' from which the higher peaks rise as '''[[nunataks]]'''. Image:Columbia Icefield-Saskatchewan Glacier.jpg|'''[[Ice field]]''' is an area less than '''50,000 km²''' (19,305 mile²) of ice often found in the colder '''[[climates]]''' and higher '''[[altitudes]]''' of the world where there is sufficient '''[[precipitation]]'''. It is an extensive area of interconnected '''[[valley]]''' '''[[glaciers]]''' from which the higher peaks rise as '''[[nunataks]]'''.
 +
 +Image:Ice Fall.jpg|'''[[Ice Fall]]''': the '''[[ice]]''' equivalent of a waterfall. As ice flows over a drop-off, it may break apart and then reform at the base of the drop-off.
Image:Lake Louise Canada.jpg|'''[[Lake]]''' (from Latin lacus) is a terrain feature (or physical feature), a body of '''[[liquid]]''' on the surface of a world that is localized to the bottom of basin (another type of '''[[landform]]''' or terrain feature; that is, it is not global). Image:Lake Louise Canada.jpg|'''[[Lake]]''' (from Latin lacus) is a terrain feature (or physical feature), a body of '''[[liquid]]''' on the surface of a world that is localized to the bottom of basin (another type of '''[[landform]]''' or terrain feature; that is, it is not global).
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Image:Ravines on side of mountain.jpg|'''[[Ravine]]''' is a very small '''[[valley]]'''—almost like a '''[[canyon]]''' but narrower—which is often the product of streamcutting '''[[erosion]]'''. Ravines are typically classified as larger in scale than '''[[gullies]]''', although Image:Ravines on side of mountain.jpg|'''[[Ravine]]''' is a very small '''[[valley]]'''—almost like a '''[[canyon]]''' but narrower—which is often the product of streamcutting '''[[erosion]]'''. Ravines are typically classified as larger in scale than '''[[gullies]]''', although
smaller than '''[[valleys]]'''. smaller than '''[[valleys]]'''.
 +
 +Image:Ribbon Lake.JPG|'''[[Ribbon lake]]''' is a long and narrow, finger-shaped '''[[lake]]''', usually found in a glacial trough. Its formation begins when a '''[[glacier]]''' moves over an area containing alternate bands of hard and soft bedrock. The sharp-edged '''[[boulders]]''' that are picked up by the glacier and carried at the bottom of the glacier erode the softer rock more quickly by abrasion, thus creating a hollow called a rock basin. On either side of the rock basin, the more resistant rock is eroded less and these outcrops of harder rock are known as rock bars, which act as dams between which rainwater may accumulate after the retreat of the ice age, filling up the rock basin and creating a ribbon lake.
 +
 +Image:Mountain riparian area.png|'''[[Riparian areas]]''' Pertaining to anything connected with or immediately adjacent to the banks of a '''[[stream]]''', '''[[river]]''', '''[[wetlands]]''' or flowing watercourse.
Image:Gratitude-Rocks.jpg|'''[[Rock]]''' or stone is a naturally occurring '''[[solid]]''' '''[[aggregate]]''' of minerals and/or mineraloids. The Earth's outer solid layer, the '''[[lithosphere]]''', is made of rock. In general rocks are of three types, namely, '''[[igneous]]''', '''[[sedimentary]]''', and '''[[metamorphic]]'''. The scientific study of rocks is called petrology, and petrology is an essential component of geology. Image:Gratitude-Rocks.jpg|'''[[Rock]]''' or stone is a naturally occurring '''[[solid]]''' '''[[aggregate]]''' of minerals and/or mineraloids. The Earth's outer solid layer, the '''[[lithosphere]]''', is made of rock. In general rocks are of three types, namely, '''[[igneous]]''', '''[[sedimentary]]''', and '''[[metamorphic]]'''. The scientific study of rocks is called petrology, and petrology is an essential component of geology.
 +
 +Image:Mountain ridge.png|'''[[Ridge]]''' is a geological feature that features a continuous elevational crest for some distance. Ridges are usually termed '''[[hills]]''' or '''[[mountains]]''' as well, depending on size.
Image:Bow river and castle mountain alberta canada 1.jpg|A '''[[river]]''' is a natural '''[[watercourse]]''', usually '''[[freshwater]]''', flowing toward an ocean, a '''[[lake]]''', a sea, or another river. Bow River and Castle Mountain Alberta Canada Image:Bow river and castle mountain alberta canada 1.jpg|A '''[[river]]''' is a natural '''[[watercourse]]''', usually '''[[freshwater]]''', flowing toward an ocean, a '''[[lake]]''', a sea, or another river. Bow River and Castle Mountain Alberta Canada
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Image:Morteratsch- und persgletscher.jpg|'''[[Valley Glacier]]''': an '''[[alpine glacier]]''' flowing in a '''[[valley]]'''. In mountainous regions, glacial flow is restricted by the '''[[valley]]''' walls. These '''[[glaciers]]''' start in '''[[cirques]]''' and extend down-valley from the '''[[cirque]]'''. Image:Morteratsch- und persgletscher.jpg|'''[[Valley Glacier]]''': an '''[[alpine glacier]]''' flowing in a '''[[valley]]'''. In mountainous regions, glacial flow is restricted by the '''[[valley]]''' walls. These '''[[glaciers]]''' start in '''[[cirques]]''' and extend down-valley from the '''[[cirque]]'''.
 +
 +Image:Wetlands-area--Slide-Mountain.jpg|'''[[Wetlands]]''' is an area of land whose soil is saturated with '''[[moisture]]''' either permanently or seasonally. Such areas may also be covered partially or completely by shallow pools of '''[[water]]'''. Wetlands include swamps, marshes, and bogs, among others. The water found in wetlands can be '''[[saltwater]]''', '''[[freshwater]]''', or brackish.
Image:Wind scoop.jpg|'''[[Wind scoop]]''' Hollow around '''[[rock]]''' outcrop caused by wind '''[[erosion]]''' or enhanced '''[[ablation]]'''. Image:Wind scoop.jpg|'''[[Wind scoop]]''' Hollow around '''[[rock]]''' outcrop caused by wind '''[[erosion]]''' or enhanced '''[[ablation]]'''.
 +
 +Image:Watercourse Stream Valley.jpg|'''[[Watercourse]]''' is any flowing body of '''[[water]]'''. These include '''[[rivers]]''', '''[[stream]]s''', brooks, anabranches, and so forth.
 +
 +Image:Watershed.JPG|'''[[Watershed]]''' is, in simplest terms, the area of land from which '''[[precipitation]]''' or surface '''[[water]]''' flow is drained into a receiving water body. The term is roughly analogous to "drainage basin", and are often used either interchangeably. While primarily describing the geologic/geographic drainage patterns of water, a more holistic view of the word watershed incorporates all the biotic and abiotic communities and processes contained in the drainage basin.
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Current revision

Landform or physical feature comprises a geomorphological unit, and is largely defined by its surface form and location in the landscape, as part of the terrain, and as such, is typically an element of topography.

Landform elements also include seascape and oceanic waterbody interface features such as bays, peninsulas, seas and so forth, including sub-aqueous terrain features such as submersed mountain ranges, volcanoes, and the great ocean basins.

[edit] Reference

  • Wikipedia Landform [3]

[edit] Landform Gallery




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