Frost line

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(New page: '''Frost line'''—also known as frost depth or '''freezing''' depth—is most commonly the depth to which the '''groundwater''' in '''soil''' is expected to freeze. The fr...)
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-'''[[Frost line]]'''—also known as frost depth or '''[[freezing]]''' depth—is most commonly the depth to which the '''[[groundwater]]''' in '''[[soil]]''' is expected to freeze. The frost depth depends on the '''[[climatic]]''' conditions of an area, the heat transfer properties of the soil and adjacent materials, and on nearby heat sources. For example, '''[[snow cover]]''' and asphalt insulate the ground and homes can heat the ground. Alternatively, in Arctic and Antarctic locations the freezing depth is so deep that it becomes year-round '''[[permafrost]]''', and the term "'''[[thaw depth]]'''" is used instead. +[[Image:Permafrost chart.jpg|thumb|300px|An illustration of the range in temperatures experienced at different depths in the ground during the year. The active layer (shown in grey) thaws each summer and freezes each winter, while the permafrost layer remains below 0°C.]]
 +'''[[Frost line]]'''—also known as frost depth or '''[[freezing]]''' depth—is most commonly the depth to which the '''[[groundwater]]''' in '''[[soil]]''' is expected to freeze.
 + 
 +The frost depth depends on the '''[[climatic]]''' conditions of an area, the heat transfer properties of the soil and adjacent materials, and on nearby heat sources.
 + 
 +For example, '''[[snow cover]]''' and asphalt insulate the ground and homes can heat the ground. Alternatively, in Arctic and Antarctic locations the freezing depth is so deep that it becomes year-round '''[[permafrost]]''', and the term "'''[[thaw depth]]'''" is used instead.
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[[Category:Freestyle Glossary]][[Category:Working with Snow and the Weather]][[Category:Weather]][[Category:Snow]][[Category:Freestyle Course Preparation]] [[Category:Freestyle Glossary]][[Category:Working with Snow and the Weather]][[Category:Weather]][[Category:Snow]][[Category:Freestyle Course Preparation]]
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An illustration of the range in temperatures experienced at different depths in the ground during the year. The active layer (shown in grey) thaws each summer and freezes each winter, while the permafrost layer remains below 0°C.
An illustration of the range in temperatures experienced at different depths in the ground during the year. The active layer (shown in grey) thaws each summer and freezes each winter, while the permafrost layer remains below 0°C.

Frost line—also known as frost depth or freezing depth—is most commonly the depth to which the groundwater in soil is expected to freeze.

The frost depth depends on the climatic conditions of an area, the heat transfer properties of the soil and adjacent materials, and on nearby heat sources.

For example, snow cover and asphalt insulate the ground and homes can heat the ground. Alternatively, in Arctic and Antarctic locations the freezing depth is so deep that it becomes year-round permafrost, and the term "thaw depth" is used instead.


[edit] Also See

[edit] Reference

  1. Wikipedia Frost line [1]

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