Trail System

From Fiswiki

Jump to: navigation, search
Trail System Each trail must have generally consistent grade within a given ability level to provide an interesting and challenging ski experience for the ability level for which the trail is designed. Optimum trail widths should vary depending upon topographic conditions and the caliber of the skier being served. The trail network must minimize cross-traffic and should provide the full range of ability levels consistent with market demand. The trails must be designed and constructed to minimize off fallline conditions and to avoid bottlenecks and convergence zones, which might produce skier congestion.
Trail System Each trail must have generally consistent grade within a given ability level to provide an interesting and challenging ski experience for the ability level for which the trail is designed. Optimum trail widths should vary depending upon topographic conditions and the caliber of the skier being served. The trail network must minimize cross-traffic and should provide the full range of ability levels consistent with market demand. The trails must be designed and constructed to minimize off fallline conditions and to avoid bottlenecks and convergence zones, which might produce skier congestion.

Trail System Each trail must have generally consistent grade within a given ability level to provide an interesting and challenging ski experience for the ability level for which the trail is designed.

Optimum trail widths should vary depending upon topographic conditions and the caliber of the skier being served.

The trail network must minimize cross-traffic and should provide the full range of ability levels consistent with market demand.

The trails must be designed and constructed to minimize off fallline conditions and to avoid bottlenecks and convergence zones, which might produce skier congestion.

[edit] Slope Steepness

There are two ways of measuring slope steepness. The first is a measurement using degrees, which measures the angle of the slope in degrees from the horizontal. The second is a percentage.
There are two ways of measuring slope steepness. The first is a measurement using degrees, which measures the angle of the slope in degrees from the horizontal. The second is a percentage.

There are two ways of measuring slope steepness. The first is a measurement using degrees, which measures the angle of the slope in degrees from the horizontal. The second is a percentage.

This is calculated using the formula 100*rise/run. Rise is the vertical change and run is the horizontal distance. A 100% slope is angled at 45 degrees.

  • 10% is equivalent to 5.71º
  • 20% is equivalent to 11.31º
  • 30% is equivalent to 16.7º
  • 40% is equivalent to 21.8º
  • 50% is equivalent to 25.67º
  • 75% is equivalent to 36.8º
  • 100% is equivalent to 45º

A beginner slope is typically between 6% and 25%. Intermediate hills range from 25% to 40%, and expert is 40% plus.


[edit] Also See

[edit] Reference

  • Las Vegas Ski and Snowboard Resort Draft Master Development Plan [1]

Return to Ski lift, Ski Related Definitions, Freestyle Equipment Rules, General Definitions or Freestyle Skiing

Personal tools